Authored by Shely Berry and Amy Lawrence.

The creativity with which people around the world have responded, and continue to respond, to this pandemic in addressing the needs of others is remarkable. Virtual educational services, or “EdTech”, are one of the most visible needs as schools around the world transition to online learning. Many companies are highlighting the educational aspects of their current products and services or creating entirely new products and services that fall squarely within the EdTech industry. The goal: to assist those who now find themselves trying to figure out how to be safe at home, “teach children,” and focus on the ninety-nine other tasks that have to be completed at the exact same time.

It’s one thing if you made your online guitar lessons free for a general audience (thank you, Fender), but another if you provide products and services for educational purposes. You may find yourself subject to several state and federal privacy laws. At least 40 states have one or more such laws.

This blog post highlights the state laws that regulate the EdTech industry by aligning with California’s 2014 law, known as the Student Online Personal Information Protection Act (“SOPIPA”). Twenty-four states and the District of Columbia have SOPIPA-type laws aimed at limiting the use of personal information (and similarly defined terms) collected from students through EdTech products or services.
Continue Reading When it Comes to Virtual Learning, Privacy Isn’t as Easy as 2 + 2 = 4

As an IP and privacy lawyer (@ipprivacylawyer), I always find it interesting when my two usually distinct practice areas converge.  Well, today brought some fascinating news at the intersection of copyright and privacy that I did not expect to see on my otherwise depressing Twitter feed. 
Continue Reading Trump’s Copyright Office Expands Privacy Rights For . . . Transgender Individuals?