On July 24, 2019, the FTC announced a $5 billion settlement with Facebook to address Facebook’s alleged violations of the FTC Act and its 2012 consent order with the FTC. The settlement comes as no surprise to the privacy community – Facebook has been closely scrutinized by the public and regulators since the Cambridge Analytica data incident in March 2018 and indicated to investors earlier this year that it anticipated a fine from the FTC between $3 and $5 billion.

We have read the complaint, settlement, and press releases issued by the FTC and Facebook, and provide our thoughts below on what it means for business:
Continue Reading

For the fourth time, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has reached a consent agreement with a company for alleged misrepresentations regarding Privacy Shield certification. A California-based company, ReadyTech Corporation, agreed to a settlement whereby it is “prohibited from misrepresenting its participation in any privacy or security program sponsored by a government or any self-regulatory or standard-setting organization, including but not limited to the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield framework and the Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield framework.” Privacy Shield is one of a few mechanisms that are available to U.S. companies for the lawful transfer of personal data from the European Union and Switzerland to the United States pursuant to applicable data protection laws including the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). As part of the process, companies must self-certify with the Department of Commerce (DoC) and then annually re-certify that the company is Privacy Shield compliant.

Continue Reading

On July 5, 2017, the FTC announced a settlement with Blue Global Media, LLC (“Blue Global”) and its CEO Christopher Kay over allegations that the company solicited consumers to provide sensitive information based on false pretenses and then shared that information with potential buyers without any regard for the protection or security of that information. The settlement provides key insights into the FTC’s current position on the processing of sensitive information.
Continue Reading