The Small Business Administration (SBA) is having some technical issues, to say the least. Small government agencies are notorious for suffering from technological inadequacy and poor information security measures, and the SBA appears to be no exception as it forms a bottleneck between small businesses and federal aid.

As part of its compliance with law, the SBA sent a “Data Breach” notification to as many as 8,000 Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) applicants. The SBA recently expanded the EIDL’s coverage to assist small businesses affected by the fallout of COVID-19. Though the loans were targeted at providing quick relief and funds were supposed to be delivered just a few days after application, many applicants waited weeks and continue to wait. The SBA seemingly did not have the technical processes in place to handle the deluge of applications it received. Unsurprisingly, delays, system crashes, and even a data breach occurred. Specifically, a flaw in the SBA’s loan application portal allowed applicants to see another user’s information if the back button was clicked. The SBA disabled that part of the site and fixed the bug, but not before inadvertent disclosures occurred.


Continue Reading Technical Woes at the SBA Cause Data Breach and Continue to Cause Delays

By Nicole Hyland and James Mariani

Every day, clients entrust their lawyers with confidential information.  Whether in a matrimonial dispute, high-stakes corporate acquisition, commercial litigation, criminal defense matter, or any other sensitive legal issue, clients rely on their lawyers to safeguard information that could be detrimental or embarrassing to the client if disclosed.  A lawyer’s ethical obligation to protect such confidential information is embodied in Rule 1.6 of the Rules of Professional Conduct (“RPCs”), which states in relevant part that “a lawyer shall not knowingly reveal confidential information.” The duty of confidentiality is not limited, however, to intentional disclosures.  Rule 1.6(c) also requires a lawyer to “make reasonable efforts to prevent the inadvertent or unauthorized disclosure or use of, or unauthorized access to” confidential information.
Continue Reading Once More Unto the Breach: A Timely Lawsuit Raises Questions About the Duty to Notify Clients of a Data Breach

On July 5, 2017, the FTC announced a settlement with Blue Global Media, LLC (“Blue Global”) and its CEO Christopher Kay over allegations that the company solicited consumers to provide sensitive information based on false pretenses and then shared that information with potential buyers without any regard for the protection or security of that information. The settlement provides key insights into the FTC’s current position on the processing of sensitive information.
Continue Reading Data for Sale . . . at a Price – FTC Imposes $104 Million Judgment against Company over Alleged Unlawful Sharing of Consumers’ Sensitive Information