Apple is days away from releasing the public version of iOS14.5, which will bring a seismic shift in the way the operating system functions with respect to privacy. In particular, the operating system introduces two major changes.

The first change is a requirement that all apps must include a privacy nutrition label within the App Store that helps users better understand the app developer’s privacy practices prior to download (this feature is actually already live). The second change is a requirement that all apps that use information for tracking purposes must obtain opt-in consent from the user prior to engaging in such tracking.

As a privacy lawyer in the ad tech space, I’ve been closely watching the dialogue around iOS14 since these changes were unveiled at WWDC last June, and I thought it would be helpful to provide my thoughts on these changes. This post reflects my own opinion, and not those of the firm or anyone else.


Continue Reading iOS 14.5: An Imperfect Step Forward for Privacy

On February 6, 2017, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) in conjunction with the Office of the New Jersey Attorney General announced a settlement with Vizio Inc. (“Vizio”), including payment of $1.5 million to the FTC and $1 million to the New Jersey Division of Consumer Affairs, with $300,000 of that amount suspended, over claims that Vizio’s smart TVs collected information about consumers’ video viewing behavior and shared that data with third parties without sufficient notice or consent. This settlement, along with pending class action litigation against Vizio involving similar allegations, reflects some of the privacy issues faced by developers in the Internet of Things space.
Continue Reading Get Smart: Takeaways from FTC Settlement with Vizio over TV Viewing Data